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moof's prattling

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September 15th, 2004

fragments @ 01:45 am

Current Music: Hot Butter, Popcorn

I've still not finished moving, and I need to be out by tomorrow. Looks like I'll have a long day tomorrow. (I bailed from work way early because I was getting ultra-snotful and threatening to slide into the cold I've been dodging for the past two weeks. Came home and slept for three or four hours. It's looking likely I'll call in 'moving' and sleep in to be rested and sane for the big drag.)

Ginger Snaps III (aka Ginger Snaps Back) is finally out. Wanna see. (Emily Perkins looks really, really damn cute.) Shaun of the Dead will also be coming to the Camera Cinema down in San Hoser in a week or so.

I bought a DVD burner, so I can now join the early 00s and have random-access backups. Yay.

This article explains quite well why so many high-IQ kids ain't so hot at being 'socially adjusted'.
 
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From:nephron
Date:September 15th, 2004 09:21 am (UTC)
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The question is- why would you *want* to be socially adjusted?
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From:moof
Date:September 15th, 2004 10:27 am (UTC)
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It'd be nice to have the option to be socially adjusted - and to not feel so alienated once in a while.
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From:nephron
Date:September 15th, 2004 03:20 pm (UTC)
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I thought that, but then I got over the desire :P

Just need to find the right social group for which you don't need to adjust (much).
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From:inoah
Date:September 15th, 2004 03:56 pm (UTC)
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Because, in short, people can impede your progress. At the very least, rubbing people the right way makes it easier to find jobs, conduct business, find people to have sex with, etc.

You can get by without being particularly socially adjusted, but it's a lot harder. And why make things difficult for yourself if you don't have to?
Even if you regard most of society's norms as distasteful, you can get a lot further by gaming the system than by resisting it.
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From:saturnia
Date:September 15th, 2004 02:21 pm (UTC)
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Ginger Snaps III (aka Ginger Snaps Back) is finally out.

YES! Thanks for the reminder! I should send the boy to Fry's tonight!

Wanna come over and watch?
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From:moof
Date:September 16th, 2004 03:48 am (UTC)
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I'm in the slow, painful process of dragging stuff over to my new place (as I have to be out by tomorrow); otherwise, I'd say 'hell yeah.'
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From:saturnia
Date:September 16th, 2004 05:18 am (UTC)
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Will you still be living on the peninsula?

James did bring home the DVD today. Let me know if you want to come over some time after you get settled. :)
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From:inoah
Date:September 15th, 2004 03:50 pm (UTC)
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I infer from this article that the author considers intelligence as something with only a single axis, and social adjustment as some other kind of ability.

That is hardly a unique perspective, but I'm not sure I buy it. Many people are exceptionally gifted in one area or another (music, math, painting, etc) and completely inept in others and not just for lack of trying. The "polymaths", like Da Vinci or, say, Knuth, are quite rare.

So I claim that the ability to adapt to social norms is a form of intelligence also. In fact intelligence is a vector of some unknown number of dimensions, where we only use a scalar to represent it; clearly something is wrong there, or at least very naive.

Perhaps most of our brains only have the capacity to develop strong abilities in a small number of areas, and emphasis along one axis leads to deficits in the others. I'm not convinced from the article that people with similar IQs (according to their metric) get along well with each other; the article mentioned that genius societies are plagued with schisms, vendettas, etc. Now this is true in many other social groups as well so I don't know how relevant IQ is. But I speculate that there are a few people with high IQs who are also quite well socially adjusted; these people have the fortune to be highly intelligent along multiple axes. Since social groups are constructs, you could look at the ability to fit within them as a kind of adaptability intelligence.

Of course I could be completely wrong.
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From:dr_beep
Date:September 15th, 2004 03:55 pm (UTC)
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I am quite exited by Shaun of the dead... and I have no idea why. I know almost nothing about it, but somehow some impression lodged in my brain that it is going to be brilliant!

Thanks for reminding me to check when it's playing in berkeley (um, according to moviephone december 31 1969... um)
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From:merovingian
Date:September 15th, 2004 10:59 pm (UTC)
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I propose reversing the direction of causality, and declaring that the correlation shows that social maladjustment makes you smart!

I heart reversing the direction of causality.
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From:aleeceh
Date:September 16th, 2004 06:47 pm (UTC)

You might also enjoy ...

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Paul Graham's essay, "Why Nerds Are Unpopular".
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From:moof
Date:September 17th, 2004 08:56 pm (UTC)

Re: You might also enjoy ...

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Hmmm. It's an interesting essay; it meanders more than a little bit, however, and I think he dilutes his point in doing so. The actual focus seems to be more about the masks we create for public consumption than about how nerds portray themselves; if anything, it begs the questions of how and why nerdly folk (such as moi) portray themselves as they do, what's effective or not about them, and so forth. Saying "it's simply not a priority" is missing a lot of the nature of what's going on (and perhaps colors things too much with a mature, developed viewpoint.)

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